Emerging Adults’ Friends with Benefits Relationships

Friends with benefits is a relationship where friends are sexually, but not romantically, involved (Lehmiller, VanderDrtift, & Kelly, 2011). It is a type of relationship that is growing in popularity for young adults, frequently replacing traditional dating (Bradshaw, Kahn, & Salville, 2010). The goal of friends with benefits relationships is to maintain a friendship while engaging in physical intimacy without romantic emotional attachment (Gusarova, Fraser & Alderson, 2012). Although this type of relationship aims for equality, friends with benefits relationships are controversial due to the presence of a sexual double standard in which men are permitted to have more sexual freedom than women (Conley, Ziegler, & Moors, 2012). In order to better understand modern emerging adult sexual relationships, it is important to consider young adults’ attitudes about friends with benefits relationships and their participation in this form of relationship. Because it is possible that social views differentially influence emerging adults’ attitudes and behaviors, researchers have investigated the ways that peers, parents, and media view friends with benefits relationships. Of particular importance is that there seems to be a discrepancy between the way in which male and female sexual behaviors are not evaluated equally. We began by exploring how social views on FWB relationships are related to male and female emerging adults’ attitudes and behaviors. We then reported on a case study that we conducted to understand more about college-aged students’ Friends with Benefits (FWB) relationships.

Twins in School

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Effects of Breastfeeding and Breastfeeding in Public

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Hospice Volunteerism in Residents of a Skilled Nursing Facility

Volunteering within their community greatly benefits older adults, contributing to increased optimism, self-perceived health, and feelings of connectedness. However, most of the literature examines the volunteerism of community dwelling seniors, with few studies examining the experiences of older adult volunteers living in care facilities. The present study aims to compare the motives and experiences of community dwelling volunteers with a sample of four residents of Bayside Care Center that participated in hospice volunteer training. Two focus groups were conducted with the residents following their training, and the recorded contents were transcribed for qualitative analysis. Results indicated that this group of older adults exhibited similar motivations to community dwelling seniors in the existing literature. However, due to delays in the program’s implementation, the present study was unable to examine whether hospice volunteerism resulted in similar benefits for this population.

Child Life Specialists’ Facilitation of Family-Centered Care: The Importance of Sibling Support

Certified Child Life Specialists’ understanding of family-centered care, and their beliefs and practices involving siblings of chronically/critically ill children were examined using an online survey. Participants were Certified Child Life Specialists recruited form the Child Life Council Forum. Relationships between utilization of certain words and support programs offered to siblings, were examined. Findings revealed a relationship in one area of coded language and support program for siblings, but not the other. Findings also revealed that all CCLS believe in the inclusion of siblings during the treatment process, however they are offered less support services than parents. Diverse results regarding multiple beliefs and practices of family-centered care and sibling inclusion raise further questions for future research.

Video Games: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

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Talking with Children About Potentially Sensitive Topics: Birth, Sex, Death, and Santa

Our study looks at conversations between parents/caregivers and their children about potentially sensitive topics including birth, sex, death, and fantastical beings (i.e. Santa Claus, the tooth fairy, the Easter bunny). Our paper covers information on what children know, Parent conversations, and cultural differences between all these topics. Our methods Are broken up into two parts: a parent survey and an informative website. The survey was distributed locally and included questions about parents’ beliefs towards how much their children knew about these topics and their attitudes about having the conversations. The website was created to be a tool for parents and combines the key findings of our literature review with our own survey-based research.

Boys’ and Girls’ Early Science-Related Experiences and Opportunities

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The Effects of Breastfeeding and the Importance of Teen Education

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Fostering Children’s Interest in Science Learning Through the Use of a Hands-On Gardening Activity

In this project, we reviewed existing understandings of how children and families engage in informal science learning during visits to museums and gardens. We then developed and implemented a learning workshop designed to increase children’s science learning and interest by engaging them in activities related to gardening and plant growth. Our workshop was titled “Little Farmers” and was a one-day event that took place at the San Luis Obispo Children’s Museum. The main goal was to facilitate parent-child interactions in an informal science learning setting. In order to do this, we developed several activities that included: seed planting, reading, coloring book, games, photo opportunity, and prompting signage. The visitors on the day of the workshop consisted of about 20 families with young children, ranging from 2 to 10 years of age. The most popular and engaging activity was the seed planting station, where parents and children worked together to plant the seeds and discuss the process of growth. We designed the workshop to be guided by the parent or the child in order to facilitate their interactions. However, lack of facilitation at each station led to low participation in several activities, including our games. Due to the low interest in our games, we chose to do a follow-up activity with a local Girl Scout troop to see if the games were effective. There was a positive response, which revealed that an older audience and increased facilitation was crucial to interest in the games, which led to learning. Overall, our workshop was a success at providing a space for parent-child interactions to engage in informal science learning.

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